5 Steps to Reduce Breast Cancer

There has been estimated about 268,600 cases of breast cancer in women and about 2,670 cases in men this year. Only 5-10% of breast cancer is due to genetics because it has been found that environmental and lifestyle factors play a huge role in the other +90% of breast cancers. Here are 5 simple ways to start reducing your risk of breast cancer whether you have the genes or not.

  1. Eat More Plants: Studies have shown that eating a variety of plant foods contains different antioxidants that help fight free radicals and suppress tumor growth. Studies have also shown that eating meat (especially red meat), dairy, and unhealthy fats increase risk of breast cancer. 
  2. Exercise/Movement: Sedentary lifestyles increases insulin resistance, elevated sex hormones such as estrogen, and inflammatory factors which are risk factors for breast cancer. Studies report obesity has 20-40% increased risk of breast cancer post-menopause. Studies also show high physical activity reduces risk in women treated for breast cancer by 39%.
  3. Reduce Stress: There are no studies to date correlating stress and increased risk of breast cancer. However, stress suppresses our immune system and can increase oxidative stress. Oxidative stress causes increase of free radicals in the body which damages DNA and cell membranes. 
  4. Quality & Quantity Sleep: Studies have shown that not getting enough sleep and distortion of our circadian rhythm can increase risk of breast cancer.
  5. Avoid Xenoestrogens & Endocrine Disruptors: Increase certain estrogen metabolites and cause hormonal imbalance which increases risk of breast cancer. 

Together let’s rethink Breast Cancer and empower others to do the same. Live with Intention and Be Radiant!

RESOURCES:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905191/

https://academic.oup.com/epirev/article/36/1/114/566646

https://journals.lww.com/acsm-csmr/FullText/2017/07000/Exercise_in_the_Prevention_and_Treatment_of_Breast.15.aspx

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24767622 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19643176 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30460465

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24156520

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22450856